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1. In our TeaViewModel class, that extends ViewModel, we have such prorerty:

val tea: LiveData<Tea>

An observer in our Activity (type of mViewModel variable in example is TeaViewModel) is set in this way:

mViewModel!!.tea.observe(this, Observer { tea: Tea? -> displayTea(tea) })

What will be a correct displayTea method definition?

2. What is the incorrect statement about Data Access Object (androidx.room.Dao)?

3. About running a debuggable build variant. Usually, you can just select the default "debug" variant that's included in every Android Studio project (even though it's not visible in the build.gradle file). But if you define new build types that should be debuggable, you must add ‘debuggable true’ to the build type.

Is that mostly true?

4. In general, you should send an AccessibilityEvent whenever the content of your custom view changes. For example, if you are implementing a custom slider bar that allows a user to select a numeric value by pressing the left or right arrows, your custom view should emit an event of type TYPE_VIEW_TEXT_CHANGED whenever the slider value changes.

Which one of the following sample codes demonstrates the use of the sendAccessibilityEvent() method to report this event.

5. The Testing Pyramid, shown in the Figure, illustrates how your app should include the three categories of tests: small, medium, and large. Small tests are unit tests that:



6. For example, we have a file in our assets folder app/src/main/assets/sample_teas.json.

To get an InputStream for reading it, from out Context context, we can try do this:

7. For example, our preferences.xml file was added by addPreferencesFromResource (R.xml.preferences).

Our preferences.xml file contains such item:

<ListPreference android:id="@+id/order_by" android:key="@string/pref_sort_key"

android:title="@string/pref_sort_title" android:summary="@string/pref_sort_summary"

android:dialogTitle="@string/pref_sort_dialog_title" android:entries="@array/sort_oder"

android:entryValues="@array/sort_oder_value"

android:defaultValue="@string/pref_default_sort_value" app:iconSpaceReserved="false" />

In our Fragment, we can dynamically get current notification preference value in this way:

8. To automate UI tests with Android Studio, you implement your test code in a separate Android test folder. Folder could be named:

9. The Log class allows you to create log messages that appear in logcat. Generally, you could use the following log methods: (Choose five.)

10. Once your test has obtained a UiObject object, you can call the methods in the UiObject class to perform user interactions on the UI component represented by that object.

You can specify such actions as: (Choose four.)


 

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