Why is the root file system mounted read-only during boot and remounted with write permission later on?

Why is the root file system mounted read-only during boot and remounted with write permission later on?
A . Because if problems with the root file system are detected during the boot, fsck can be run, without risk of damage.
B . Because this way crackers cannot collect information about root with boot sniffers.
C . To avoid writing to the disk, unless the root password is known.
D . To avoid other operating systems overwriting the Linux root partition.
E . Because the disk has its own write protection that cannot be changed by the operating system.

Answer: A

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