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1. Which statement is correct when considering the right to privacy under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR)?

2. What is one major goal that the OECD Guidelines, Convention 108 and the Data Protection Directive (Directive 95/46/EC) all had in common but largely failed to achieve in Europe?

3. A key component of the OECD Guidelines is the “Individual Participation Principle”.

What parts of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) provide the closest equivalent to that principle?

4. Which EU institution is vested with the competence to propose new data protection legislation on its own initiative?

5. What is an important difference between the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) and the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) in relation to their roles and functions?

6. SCENARIO

Please use the following to answer the next question:

Anna and Frank both work at Granchester University. Anna is a lawyer responsible for data protection, while Frank is a lecturer in the engineering department.

The University maintains a number of types of records:

- Student records, including names, student numbers, home addresses, pre-university information,

university attendance and performance records, details of special educational needs and financial

information.

- Staff records, including autobiographical materials (such as curricula, professional contact files, student evaluations and other relevant teaching files).

- Alumni records, including birthplaces, years of birth, dates of matriculation and conferrals of degrees. These records are available to former students after registering through Granchester’s Alumni portal.

- Department for Education records, showing how certain demographic groups (such as first-generation students) could be expected, on average, to progress. These records do not contain names or identification numbers.

- Under their security policy, the University encrypts all of its personal data records in transit and at rest.

In order to improve his teaching, Frank wants to investigate how his engineering students perform in relational to Department for Education expectations. He has attended one of Anna’s data protection training courses and knows that he should use no more personal data than necessary to accomplish his goal. He creates a program that will only export some student data: previous schools attended, grades originally obtained, grades currently obtained and first time university attended. He wants to keep the records at the individual student level. Mindful of Anna’s training, Frank runs the student numbers through an algorithm to transform them into different reference numbers. He uses the same algorithm on each occasion so that he can update each record over time.

One of Anna’s tasks is to complete the record of processing activities, as required by the GDPR. After receiving her email reminder, as required by the GDPR. After receiving her email reminder, Frank informs Anna about his performance database.

Ann explains to Frank that, as well as minimizing personal data, the University has to check that this new use of existing data is permissible. She also suspects that, under the GDPR, a risk analysis may have to be carried out before the data processing can take place. Anna arranges to discuss this further with Frank after she has done some additional research.

Frank wants to be able to work on his analysis in his spare time, so he transfers it to his home laptop (which is not encrypted). Unfortunately, when Frank takes the laptop into the University he loses it on the train. Frank has to see Anna that day to discuss compatible processing. He knows that he needs to report security incidents, so he decides to tell Anna about his lost laptop at the same time.

Which of the University’s records does Anna NOT have to include in her record of processing activities?

7. SCENARIO

Please use the following to answer the next question:

Anna and Frank both work at Granchester University. Anna is a lawyer responsible for data protection, while Frank is a lecturer in the engineering department.

The University maintains a number of types of records:

- Student records, including names, student numbers, home addresses, pre-university information,

university attendance and performance records, details of special educational needs and financial

information.

- Staff records, including autobiographical materials (such as curricula, professional contact files, student evaluations and other relevant teaching files).

- Alumni records, including birthplaces, years of birth, dates of matriculation and conferrals of degrees. These records are available to former students after registering through Granchester’s Alumni portal.

- Department for Education records, showing how certain demographic groups (such as first-generation students) could be expected, on average, to progress. These records do not contain names or identification numbers.

- Under their security policy, the University encrypts all of its personal data records in transit and at rest.

In order to improve his teaching, Frank wants to investigate how his engineering students perform in relational to Department for Education expectations. He has attended one of Anna’s data protection training courses and knows that he should use no more personal data than necessary to accomplish his goal. He creates a program that will only export some student data: previous schools attended, grades originally obtained, grades currently obtained and first time university attended. He wants to keep the records at the individual student level. Mindful of Anna’s training, Frank runs the student numbers through an algorithm to transform them into different reference numbers. He uses the same algorithm on each occasion so that he can update each record over time.

One of Anna’s tasks is to complete the record of processing activities, as required by the GDPR. After receiving her email reminder, as required by the GDPR. After receiving her email reminder, Frank informs Anna about his performance database.

Ann explains to Frank that, as well as minimizing personal data, the University has to check that this new use of existing data is permissible. She also suspects that, under the GDPR, a risk analysis may have to be carried out before the data processing can take place. Anna arranges to discuss this further with Frank after she has done some additional research.

Frank wants to be able to work on his analysis in his spare time, so he transfers it to his home laptop (which is not encrypted). Unfortunately, when Frank takes the laptop into the University he loses it on the train. Frank has to see Anna that day to discuss compatible processing. He knows that he needs to report security incidents, so he decides to tell Anna about his lost laptop at the same time.

Before Anna determines whether Frank’s performance database is permissible, what additional information does she need?

8. SCENARIO

Please use the following to answer the next question:

Anna and Frank both work at Granchester University. Anna is a lawyer responsible for data protection, while Frank is a lecturer in the engineering department.

The University maintains a number of types of records:

- Student records, including names, student numbers, home addresses, pre-university information,

university attendance and performance records, details of special educational needs and financial

information.

- Staff records, including autobiographical materials (such as curricula, professional contact files, student evaluations and other relevant teaching files).

- Alumni records, including birthplaces, years of birth, dates of matriculation and conferrals of degrees. These records are available to former students after registering through Granchester’s Alumni portal.

- Department for Education records, showing how certain demographic groups (such as first-generation students) could be expected, on average, to progress. These records do not contain names or identification numbers.

- Under their security policy, the University encrypts all of its personal data records in transit and at rest.

In order to improve his teaching, Frank wants to investigate how his engineering students perform in relational to Department for Education expectations. He has attended one of Anna’s data protection training courses and knows that he should use no more personal data than necessary to accomplish his goal. He creates a program that will only export some student data: previous schools attended, grades originally obtained, grades currently obtained and first time university attended. He wants to keep the records at the individual student level. Mindful of Anna’s training, Frank runs the student numbers through an algorithm to transform them into different reference numbers. He uses the same algorithm on each occasion so that he can update each record over time.

One of Anna’s tasks is to complete the record of processing activities, as required by the GDPR. After receiving her email reminder, as required by the GDPR. After receiving her email reminder, Frank informs Anna about his performance database.

Ann explains to Frank that, as well as minimizing personal data, the University has to check that this new use of existing data is permissible. She also suspects that, under the GDPR, a risk analysis may have to be carried out before the data processing can take place. Anna arranges to discuss this further with Frank after she has done some additional research.

Frank wants to be able to work on his analysis in his spare time, so he transfers it to his home laptop (which is not encrypted). Unfortunately, when Frank takes the laptop into the University he loses it on the train. Frank has to see Anna that day to discuss compatible processing. He knows that he needs to report security incidents, so he decides to tell Anna about his lost laptop at the same time.

Anna will find that a risk analysis is NOT necessary in this situation as long as?

9. Which institution has the power to adopt findings that confirm the adequacy of the data protection level in a non-EU country?

10. What is true of both the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the Council of Europe Convention 108?


 

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